My Dog, My Baby! Is It An Insult To Call A Dogs My Baby – Or Is It Equality

aby Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
in yesterdays post I talked about how the intense influence of the recent high energy impacts has again triggered a pineal gland awakening in many people. I shared that such an awakening increases our psychic abilities, and that the energy field of Francis of Assisi can help us manage this new born inner strength. The Ascended Master Francis of Assisi is well know as a very big animal lover and healer of all wounds within the animal realm. How it works for us to use his powers in order to help our pets in their healing process, I mentioned in this article from January
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In my work I can see, that many people have followed the resent call from the universe, to increase their connection with the forces of mother nature. For some of them the first sign was an increased love for the animal kingdom, a feeling of a more direct connection and communication and a sense for our oneness. So when I ran into this article from Elisabeth Broadbent on YourTango claiming, that calling our dogs our babies would be an insult to all moms, I actually felt a bit insulted by her ;-). I think in many of her perspectives, she is missing a bigger few and claims a very small picture as “truth”. But see for yourselves! As it is easy and direct, I commented on the original article directly below and in color.

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Her fiery claim is: Say you love them, but don’t call them your “furkid.”
I have a dog. Two dogs, in fact. We got our puppies before we got our kids, and we loved them. We kissed them. We cuddled them. We bought them too many toys; we overindulged them with treats. We gave them silly pet names and let them sleep in our beds. But never did we call those beloved canines “furkids” or “furbabies”. Because the last I checked, dogs ain’t people. — Your puppy is not your child, so stop saying that he is. I have three children now, and I know this for certain — kids and dogs are not same.
The very first thing that pops into my mind on this is the question, how do we define motherhood. And is only allowed that we emotionally experience ourselves as mother, even when we have not given birth?? What is the point in this story??cThink about when you got your puppy. You probably picked him out at the local ASPCA, or selected him from the local breeder. Basically, you pointed to a dog and said, “That one.” On the other hand, most mothers went through nine months of body invasion, followed by one of the most intense physical experiences of her life. Then they dropped a baby on her chest. It was all agony and joy and angels singing. And even if you adopt, you go through paperwork and waiting hell before you find yourself weak in the knees, hands a-tremble, as you weep with joy when someone hands you your child for the first time. Getting a dog just doesn’t stack up.
Interesting that the author feels so comfortable to assume how other people came to living with dogs. In my personal case, non of her assumptions are true at all. My dog found me, she was a street dog and about 4 month when we met first. It was her who started following me for touch and kindness, and it was her who decided to give up her freedom for living with me. I was there when she got pregnant, all her pregnancy and she gave birth next to my bed. All criteria she mentions as right to claim motherhood ;-)…

Yes, both puppies and newborn babies wake up in the night. It sucks to wake up and let a dog out but it sucks more to wake up and attempt to latch an unwilling, wailing infant to your breast. Then, once you’ve managed to feed your bundle of joy, you have to get him back to sleep. The puppy doesn’t decide to party until 5am, at which point it’s time for another feeding.
Again I can just say we are talking about assumptions. How dogs behave in the night has much to do with the environment we are living in and the amount of dogs we have. I ended up with four of them, the mother and three of her boys. And my home is on the country side of Guatemala. There are tons of street dogs out there and in the night there are concerts and fights going on. Sounds a pack does react to!!

Then there’s babyproofing. You puppy-proofed your house — you removed all things chewable, took up poisonous plants, and provided appropriate chew toys. When I babyproofed my house, I had to make sure little hands couldn’t gain access to caustic cleaning fluids. I had to look for strangulation hazards (goodbye, Roman blinds) and put safety locks on all the cabinets (which are a giant pain in the ass). If I failed in my duties, I’m not facing a chewed-up family heirloom; I’m looking at a dead kid and a DSS inquiry. The stakes are a wee bit higher.
That is a very interesting way of putting the idea of responsibility and acting from a place of fear, and present it as something glorious. Don’t get me wrong, of course parents carry a big responsibility for their children’s life, but what I hear her actually saying is “ my child’s life is more worth than an animals life”, and that is what I am putting out for discussion.dNot that owning a dog isn’t high stakes. You’re responsible for the feeding and caring of your dog. Pet ownership is a serious commitment that should only be taken up by those who really mean to care for an animal for the rest of it’s natural life. You’re stuck with your dog … except you’re not because you can leave. Before my husband and I had kids, we traveled all the time — dropped the pups by the doggie spa, paid extra for playground time, and hopped the plane guilt-free. I can’t just leave my toddlers. Sure, maybe one day I’ll be able to leave them with relatives for some overnights. But it’s not quite as simple as plunking my credit card down at the kennel.
Definitely have to disagree here! First of all – ownership of a dog is an illusion that we humans have created for ourselves. Sure, we can MAKE them live with us and obey our demands – but dogs are in essence free spirits and can not really be OWNED, and because of that they actually handle life very similar than children. And – just because one can manage to get away guilt-free, and just because we can outsource our personal responsibilities in this world by spending money, does not mean our actions are correct. When ever I have to leave more than three days, and no matter how well I prepare their care-taking in our home, I can feel the irritation of my absence in the energy field of the pack.

You can mostly ignore your dog. Yes, your dog lives in your house, and yes, you love it. But your attention is not focused on the dog every moment it’s awake. Five minutes of inattention on my part and my toddler’s drinking bleach and bathing in the toilet. If my kids are awake, I need to know what they’re doing, where they’re doing it, and what they’re doing it with. I don’t have to follow them from room to room, but it helps.
Well, this one actually is insulting and contradiction to really feeling responsible for a dog. And also collectively, it is not even true! My dogs make disturbing waves in my brain when they want to reach me, they know how to interrupt the computer monitor – when I am too concentrated on writing and don’t listen, and when I am a bit tired on our morning walks – it can happen they push me out of the way with their thought waves. So hell no – when you actually have a relationship with your dogs and your third eye is a bit open, you can not ignore them at all!!!bAnd at the risk of sounding like an annoying parent here: Kids do some amazing things dogs just can’t stack up to. Sure, you can teach Fido to fetch, but that pride is nothing compared to your kid learning to read. Both give sloppy kisses, but only one lisps, “I wuv you, mommy.” Potty training’s more of a milestone. And can your dog draw you pictures with hearts on them? None of this covers the myriad of things I have to do for my kids every day. My dogs watch me prepare lunches, read The Cat in the Hat, and wipe snot off people’s faces. While my pups take their business outside, my kids require constant diaper changes.
This actually triggers compassion in me. I understand that it is wonderful to watch others grow, to see their accomplishments and celebrate their leaps, how much is it our place to be “proud about that”. There is something in the sound of this sentence that vibrates like – their success is my pay back to me – and that is something I would be careful with. 

The dogs don’t melt down when their favorite Star Wars figure breaks and they bite me a hell of a lot less. They don’t call me a “poop-head.” This is just one of the reasons I love them.
So basically she loves dogs because they don’t have a voice (in her opinion) and can not tell her, when she acts like an ass?

I know you’ll say I sound like a self-righteous parent here. Maybe you don’t ever want kids, which you’ll somehow make germane to the discussion, but which is neither here nor there. Say you love your dogs. Say they make your life worth living. Say they’re your one-and-only. Call yourself a dog person. But don’t call your dog a baby. Don’t call him your “furkid” or “furbaby.” Because baby, it’s not even close.
Well that is a Bingo, I think she sounds like a self-righteous parent here ;-). And if we are talking about insult and respect here, it is very disrespectful to all the women, who out of personal life situations, never have the chance to mother a human child!!

Dear Friends, I am very interested to hear if the past few weeks have changed something in the perception of your pineal gland. I you have different experiences with the animal kingdom and, how you think about the baby / dog discussion. Do you think that only when we are the physical mother of a human child, we have a right to claim motherhood?? Or is oneness and compassion something that brings us together so close, that the species does not matter anymore? Looking forward to hear about your inner studies!!
Love & Light

Edith

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New Science Says Your Dog Can Understand

dogincar(1)A new study published in the journal Cell, by Victoria Ratcliffe and David Reby, should lend some relief to dog owners who enjoy talking with their pets. The new research indicates that if you are one of them: you’re probably not as crazy as your friends sometimes like to joke about.

The study found that dogs actually interpret human speech in much the same way you or I do: by putting sounds together into coherent words (so interpretation based on meaning) using the left hemisphere, and figuring out the emotions and gender of the speaker using the right hemisphere. This did this by playing sound clips that varied in terms of content and sound, evaluating the dogs’ responses based on which direction their heads turned when responding to the recorded messages.

The study found that dogs showed a significant LH bias when presented with a familiar spoken command in which the salience of meaningful phonemic (segmental) cues was artificially increased but a significant RH bias in response to commands in which the salience of intonational or speaker-related (suprasegmental) vocal cues was increased. In other words, the study found that the dogs were far more likely to turn left when hearing a familiar cue, but more likely to turn right when the sounds didn’t add up: much like you or I.

This isn’t the biggest surprise, and in fact it’s something most animal lovers have “known” for quite a long time. It provides further evidence for the theory that our animal companions are capable of understanding more than a simple Pavlovian connection between a bell and food. Indeed this new research helps emphasize the difference between cats and dogs when contrasted with a 2013 study from the University of Tokyo, which showed that cats can recognize their owner calling them but simply don’t care.

downloadAlthough humans have a larger neo-cortex than our animal compatriots, allowing for more dynamic learning, we are not alone in being able to assemble tones into coherent ideas and understanding. Indeed, magpies, crows, and ravens may surpass humans in a dimension of this: they are able to pass on learned visual cues to the next generation through an unknown mechanism. So even though we may be the kings of dynamic and abstract learning, we certainly aren’t the only species capable of conscious interaction with the world.
How much, and to what degree, our animal companions can understand us remains to be seen. Certainly, an increasing volume of research indicates that they understand more than many of us give them credit for.

Source: http://www.exposingtruth.com/new-science-says-dog-can-understand/#ixzz3XDUFO95S