Why Human Beings Kiss in Romantic Relationships

jkby Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
some of you might remember that over the last few month I mentioned the new paradigm of sexuality and romantic relationships, that is now arising in the world. The one thing that I found funny on this article, is that the author is mentioning the Egyptian tradition and how ancient Egyptian art portraits rather breathing than kissing. And that is one of the most beautiful tools of connection between the sexes, an exchange of conscious breathing. I hope you are having a good time with this lovely read!!
Love and Big Kiss!!
Edith

A new study finds that half of human cultures don’t practice romantic lip-on-lip kissing. Animals don’t tend to bother either. So how did it evolve? When you think about it, kissing is strange and a bit icky. You share saliva with someone, sometimes for a prolonged period of time. One kiss could pass on 80 million bacteria, not all of them good. Yet everyone surely remembers their first kiss, in all its embarrassing or delightful detail, and kissing continues to play a big role in new romances. At least, it does in some societies. People in western societies may assume that romantic kissing is a universal human behavior, but a new analysis suggests that less than half of all cultures actually do it. Kissing is also extremely rare in the animal kingdom. So what’s really behind this odd behavior? If it is useful, why don’t all animals do it – and all humans too? It turns out that the very fact that most animals don’t kiss helps explain why some do. Kissing could be quite a recent invention.
According to a new study of kissing preferences, which looked at 168 cultures from around the world, only 46% of cultures kiss in the romantic sense. The study overturns the belief that romantic kissing is a near-universal human behavior. Previous estimates had put the figure at 90%. The new study excluded parents kissing their children, and focused solely on romantic lip-on-lip action between couples. Many hunter-gatherer groups showed no evidence of kissing or desire to do so. Some even considered it revolting. The Mehinaku tribe in Brazil reportedly said it was “gross”. Humans lived in hunter-gatherer groups for most of our existence, until the invention of farming around 10,000 years ago. If modern hunter-gatherer groups do not practice romantic kissing, it is possible that our ancestors did not do so either. However we cannot be certain of this, as modern hunter-gatherer groups do not live in the same ways as the ancestral hunter-gatherers, because their societies have changed and adapted in the meantime.1439545532e88a1d79Regardless, the study overturns the belief that romantic kissing is a near-universal human behavior, says lead author William Jankowiak of the University of Nevada in Las Vegas. Instead it seems to be a product of western societies, passed on from one generation to the next, he says. There is some to back that up. Kissing as we do it today seems to be a fairly recent invention, says Rafael Wlodarski of the University of Oxford in the UK. He has trawled through records to find evidence of how kissing has changed. Is kissing something we do naturally? The oldest evidence of a kissing-type behavior comes from Hindu Vedic Sanskrit texts from over 3,500 years ago. Kissing was described as inhaling each others soul. In contrast, Egyptian hieroglyphics picture people close to each other rather than pressing their lips together.
So what is going on? Is kissing something we do naturally, but that some cultures have suppressed? Or is it something modern humans have invented? We can find some insight by looking at animals. Our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, do kiss. Primatologist Frans de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, has seen many instances of chimps kissing and hugging after conflict. As far as we know, other animals do not kiss at all. For chimpanzees, kissing is a form of reconciliation. It is more common among males than females. In other words, it is not a romantic behavior. Their cousins the bonobos kiss more often, and they often use tongues while doing so. That’s perhaps not surprising, because bonobos are highly sexual beings. When two humans meet, we might shake hands. Bonobos have sex: the so-called bonobo handshake. They also use sex for many other kinds of bonding. So their kisses are not particularly romantic, either. These two apes are exceptions. As far as we know, other animals do not kiss at all. They may nuzzle or touch their faces together, but even those that have lips don’t share saliva or purse and smack their lips together. They don’t need to.jbhTake wild boars. Males produce a pungent smell that females find extremely attractive. The key chemical is a pheromone called androstenone that triggers the females’ desire to mate. Animals often release these pheromones in their urine. From a female’s point of view this is a good thing, because males with the most androstonene are also the most fertile. Her sense of smell is so acute, she doesn’t need to get close enough to kiss the male. The same is true of many other mammals. For example, female hamsters emit a pheromone that gets males very excited. Mice follow similar chemical traces to help them find partners that are genetically different, minimizing the risk of accidental incest. “If there’s urine present in the environment they can assess compatibility through that.” The point is, animals do not need to get close to each other to smell out a good potential mate.
On the other hand, humans have an atrocious sense of smell, so we benefit from getting close. Smell isn’t the only cue we use to assess each others fitness, but studies have shown that it plays an important role in mate choice. Men also make a version of the pheromone that female boars find attractive. A study published in 1995 showed that women, just like mice, prefer the smell of men who are genetically different from them. This makes sense, as mating with someone with different genes is likely to produce healthy offspring. Kissing is a great way to get close enough to sniff out your partner’s genes. In 2013, Wlodarski examined kissing preferences in detail. He asked several hundred people what was most important when kissing someone. How they smelled featured highly, and the importance of smell increased when women were most fertile. It turns out that men also make a version of the pheromone that female boars find attractive. It is present in male sweat, and when women are exposed to it their arousal levels increase slightly. Pheromones are a big part of how mammals chose a mate, says Wlodarski, and we share some of them. “We’ve inherited all of our biology from mammals, we’ve just added extra things through evolutionary time.” jhbkYou could let go of kissing and start smelling people instead. On that view, kissing is just a culturally acceptable way to get close enough to another person to detect their pheromones. In some cultures, this sniffing behavior turned into physical lip contact. It’s hard to pinpoint when this happened, but both serve the same purpose, says Wlodarski. You’ll find just as good a partner when you smell them, and you won’t get half as many germs. Be prepared for some funny looks, though.
Source: BBC.com

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Nepal Chooses Kindness — ENDING The World’s Largest Animal Sacrifice Event

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Dear Friends,
I feel happy, excited and inspired to  share this article with you!! Beautiful things happen on the planet!! What an amazing first step for humanity and our friends from the animal kingdom – the Gadhimai slaughter festival will never be a festival of slaughter again!!!
Remember, just last month I shared two article about the waves of energy we currently receive from heavens, and how they carry the potential for healing with the animal world,  https://edithboyertelmer.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/the-june-2015-solstice/https://edithboyertelmer.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/sacred-circle-for-calling-the-animals-into-the-diamond-vortex-by-celia-fenn/. And here it is! First chance given – first chance taken – for humanity, a big step on its way into the creation of a world in balance and harmony. And a loud statement that cruelty in the name of tradition is no longer tolerateable!!  We need to be brave and embrace changing our actions on all levels of life!
Go home – hug your dog, watch a bird on your way to work or enjoy the sound of bees in the air!! Remember the peace that comes from understanding, how we are naturally one with nature!!
Blessings Edith
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Gadhimai Slaughter was blamed for the massive earthquake that hit in April and killed nearly 10,000 lives. People called it the nature’s way of punishment to humanity. Irrespective of the truth, it has influenced this decision in many ways.
In a glorious tribute to the power of compassion, the Gadhimai slaughter festival will now be a ‘momentous celebration of life.’
For centuries the Gadhimai festival in Nepal has seen temple grounds awash with the blood of animals slaughtered in the name of ‘tradition’.
This sacrifice has occurred every five years for the last 300 years.
And it stopped — today.

The Gadhimai Temple Trust hereby declares our formal decision to end animal sacrifice. With your help, we can ensure Gadhimai 2019 is free from bloodshed. Moreover, we can ensure Gadhimai 2019 is a momentous celebration of life … For every life taken, our heart is heavy. The time has come to transform an old tradition.

Hundreds of thousands of water buffalo, goats, chickens and other animals will now be saved from a brutal death by bludgeoning or decapitation.animal sacrifice event in nepal
This achievement is no small feat. We take our hats off to the extraordinary efforts of the Humane Society International/IndiaAnimal Welfare Network Nepal, and countless animal protection groups and individuals around the world who have helped inspire this victory of kindness over cruelty.
And, of course, greatest credit must go to the members of The Gadhimai Temple Trust itself, who recognized that the power to change the trajectory of our common humanity is in our hands.

The Gadhimai Temple Trust has shown that tradition is no excuse for cruelty with its landmark decision.

 

The incredible news exploded on social media, where a long running campaign has been waged on behalf of the victims of the festival. It is yet another signpost that the pathway our species is paving for itself is slowly but surely bending towards a more compassionate future, championed by caring people in every country of the world.
That is to say, we are getting kinder.
Worldwide, never before has there been such a rate of positive change — in public policy; in commerce; in public awareness and advocacyAnd never before have the animals of this world needed it so much. We have, after all, inherited an age where the majority of animals in human ‘care’ are valued not as living, thinking beings, but as commodities — spending their entire lives confined in factory farms. Nothing short of a profound global shift in thought is needed to awaken our shared responsibility toward our fellow species and break this global cycle of suffering.The Gadhimai Temple Trust has shown that tradition is no excuse for cruelty with its landmark decision.
Could the previously un-thought of Gadhimai ‘celebration of life’ festival be a sign that a kinder world is possible?
Some of the most entrenched cruelty in this world has long been defended in the name of ‘tradition’.
The Festival of Sacrifice is responsible for untold suffering of cattle, sheep and goats — millions of whom have been sold for profit through Australia’s live export trade; closer to home, in the name of Christmas, highly intelligent pigs and turkeys not only experience the terror of slaughter, but entire lifetimes of suffering in factory farms; and sporting events such as bull fights and rodeos still present cruelty as ‘entertainment’…
When kind people seek to transform cruel traditions, they don’t risk losing their identity. They strengthen it by demonstrating that culture cannot be measured by the repetition of practices frozen in time by values of the past. For this, the tradition of the Gadhimai festival will become all the stronger.
In another Nepalese tradition, there is an entire calendar day called ‘Kukur Tihar’ dedicated entirely to thanking dogs for their friendship and loyalty.
It takes compassion and courage to rise above cruelty and recognize that the ways of doing things we inherit from the past do not define us; to recognize that those we share this world with, also share our desire to avoid suffering. Whether in our temples, or in our homes, we can all choose to live without killing.

The roots of cruelty are not so much strong as widespread. But the time must come when inhumanity protected by custom and thoughtlessness will succumb before humanity championed by thought. Let us work that this time may come. Albert SchweitzerIn another Nepalese tradition, there is an entire calendar day called 'Kukur Tihar' dedicated entirely to thanking dogs for their friendship and loyalty.Compassion is fundamental to all human cultures — and when it shines through, traditions steeped in cruelty can be transformed. On scales grand and small, if we want to live in a kinder world, we all have a role to play.

And if the world’s largest animal sacrifice event can be transformed into a ‘celebration of life’, then there is reason to be infinitely hopeful about the future.