Growing Strong Beyond Religious Believe Systems And Limitations

by Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
during the past few weeks, our daily life was very intense and transformative in my little hometown on the Guatemalan country side. The changes that are collectively happening in our world right now, which are also making an influence on our personal lifestyle and the roles we play in society, have triggered many discussions and deep communication about the future of humanity and life on planet earth. We all could agree that there is a collective need to reconnect with the ancient powers of the divine feminine expressions within us and, that a lot of different religious believes could become a real obstacle on the way.
Maybe over time, we collectively will have to exchange religion for authentic spiritual connection, and remember who we truly are. For the individual human being in this huge awakening process, we need to bring back conscious initiations that allow us such a personal connection again. Than we can all live as the invoker of spirit, the natural healer, herbalists, oracles, ecstatic dancer and priestesses, that we by nature are. Do you also hear the call for self-empowerment and for raising our voices in the name of a collective awakening into the Golden Age and a brotherhood of man? Than set  yourself free from the limiting ideas you might have taken on from your upbringing and religious practice.

“What can I do, Muslims? I do not know myself.
I am neither Christian nor Jew, neither Magian nor Muslim,
I am not from east or west, not from land or sea,
not from the shafts of nature nor from the spheres of the firmament,
not of the earth, not of water, not of air, not of fire.

I am not from the highest heaven, not from this world,
not from existence, not from being.
I am not from India, not from China, not from Bulgar, not from Saqsin,
not from the realm of the two Iraqs, not from the land of Khurasan.

I am not from the world, not from beyond,
not from heaven and not from hell.
I am not from Adam, not from Eve,
not from paradise and not from Ridwan.

My place is placeless, my trace is traceless,
no body, no soul, I am from the soul of souls.
I have chased out duality,
lived the two worlds as one.

One I seek, one I know, one I see, one I call.
He is the first, he is the last, he is the outer, he is the inner.
Beyond He and He is I know no other.I am drunk from the cup of love,
the two worlds have escaped me.
I have no concern but carouse and rapture.

If one day in my life I spend a moment without you
from that hour and that time I would repent my life.
If one day I am given a moment in solitude with you
I will trample the two worlds underfoot and dance forever.

O Sun of Tabriz, I am so tipsy here in this world,
I have no tale to tell but tipsiness and rapture.”
Jalaluddin Rumi

Religion is interesting because it brings out the best and the worst in humanity. It can be a source of good deeds, whether it’s people from different spiritual backgrounds coming together to help other people in need after a crisis. But it’s also a cause for war and bloodshed.
Josh Gad

Religion is meant to teach us true spiritual human character. It is meant for self-transformation. It is meant to transform anxiety into peace, arrogance into humility, envy into compassion, to awaken the pure soul in man and his love for the Source, which is God.
Radhanath Swami

The World is my country, all mankind are my brethren, and to do good is my religion.
Thomas Paine

When I admire the wonders of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in the worship of the creator.
Mahatma Gandhi

This is my simple religion. There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.
Dalai Lama

When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. That’s my religion.
Abraham Lincoln
Dear ones, as a big fan of personal awakening and self-empowerment for the common people, I myself never felt the need to be member of any religion, club or organized group, but I do understand when others find grounding, guidance and safety in such institutions. Anyway the individual needs to get up and take self-responsibility for the separations we have created thru our own closed up minds. So  go out and make a new friend from a different religion, exchange your dreams and hopes and you will see, humans from all over the world have much more in common than you might have thought!
Love and Light!
Edith

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A Woman’s Role – Transforming An Old Paradigm In Society & Religion

wrrt8cby Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
in yesterdays article called
A Woman’s Role? How Much Influence Do “The Movies” Have On Our Society I shared a bit of a research on Walt Disney movies, by the linguists Carmen Fought and Karen Eisenhauer, that recently was discussed in the Washington Post. Their work has unveiled, that movies produced 50 years ago, gave more opportunity for women to have their voices heard, than modern creations do. Not only is that a daily struggle for female performer, we also need to ask ourselves what this imbalances are teaching us about the gender roles in modern society. Are the movies influencing our social paradigm, or is it our current paradigm that is reflected in their productions?

A personal message to all my facebook friends!! FB is limiting the distribution of my posts daily more. If you resonate with my articles and are used to find my work  shared in a group, rather sign up on my newsletter here to make sure you get the information!!! Over time I might not be able to put in the FB time, if it does not lead to what it is about – SPREADING THE WORD ;-)! 

When we look at the “role of a woman” in modern life, we can not do that without talking about religion. How can all this holiness feel completed ever, as long as the feminine is not honored? And that in particular the Churches had a massive influence on the depression of the divine feminine is not to deny. No matter which of the leading religions you look into, the idea of ascending to higher levels of consciousness and divine completion, while having manifested as a woman in the world – is not very embraced by the traditional teachings.
That lead collectively to the outcome, that women are feeling less worthy than their masculine brothers and powerless to their social dominance. Below is a book expect, which describes perfectly the struggle women have experienced around their religious identity, and how it feels to be stuck in what is supposed to be “a woman’s role in life”.acce

ONE TIME, ONE DAY
between Davie and Roberta,
I asked my mother why she persisted,
keep on having baby after baby.

She looked at me,
at a spot somewhere between my eyes,
blinked like I had suddenly fallen crazy.

She paused before answering,
as if to confide would legitimize my fears.

She drew a deep breath,
leaned against the chair,
I touched her hand and I thought
she might actually cry.

Instead she put baby Davie in my arms.
Patty, she said,
it is a woman’s role.

I decided if it was my role,
I would rather disappear!

THAT MADE ME THINK
I felt angry, frustrated.
I felt I did not belong, not in my church,
not in my home, not in my skin.

Amidst the chaos, I felt alone,
in need of a friend,
someone detached from my world.

The “woman’s role” theory disgust me…
I would soon be a woman and I knew,
I could never perform as expected.

I was tiered of my mom’s submission
to her religion, her husband’s sick quest for a heir,
to all his abuses.EmSILLY ME
I refused to believe it.
Not only that, but I started to resent the whole idea.

I had watched women crushed
beneath the weight of dreams, smashed
I had seen them bow down before their husbands;
and that not only figuratively.

I had witnessed bone-chilling abuse,
no question, no help, no escape…

All in the hopes that when they die,
and reach up from the grave,
their husbands would grab hold, tug hard,
and allow them to enter heaven.

Carmen Fought says about her insides into the movies, “There are no women leading the townspeople to go against the Beast, no women bonding together singing songs, women giving each other directions, or women inventing things. We don’t believe that little girls naturally play a certain way or speak a certain way,” she adds “They’re not born liking a pink dress. At some point we teach them.”
When I watched the video below for the first time (just ignore the title and give it a try), I was deeply touched by the honest frustration and natural outrage the girls express, about the unequal treatment they receive.

The changes that are happening right now in our lifestyle paradigm and the roles we play, allows us to reconnect with the ancient powers of the divine feminine expressions within us. So maybe over time we can exchange religion for authentic spiritual connection and remember who we truly are. As a human collective in a huge awakening process, need to bring back conscious initiations that allow us again, to be the invoker of spirit, the natural healer, herbalists, oracles, ecstatic dancer and priestesses, that we by nature are.

And what we all can do for ourselves as women, is to support another to feel self-empowered, to show respect for other women’s path, and over all acknowledge our equal right to demand space, speaking time and the respect to be heard with our needs. In Hollywood movies as much as in social interactions in daily life.
And for all of you who are working with the Ascended Master Realms, I can highly recommend to work with the energetic support of Mother Mary. Her power of blessings and renewal can help us letting go of our past and completely refresh our female energy.

Dear Ones, please don’t get me wrong I am not against any church, any kind of organized believe system or group activities that support the communion with spirit, I am simply a sucker for equality! I would also not call myself a feminist, just a self-empowered woman – aware of her equal worth to the masculine manifested beings. We will not be able to create the harmony and balance needed to unite the divine masculine and the divine feminine powers in our hearts, if we do not address the old paradigms that are so deeply implanted into societies behavior pattern right now.
Love and Blessings!!!
Edith!

If you enjoy my posts, please sign up for my daily newsletter, JUST CLICK HERE & enter your e-mail. Please also like New Beginnings Guatemala on Facebook, and keep up the good work spreading the word ;-)! Feel INVITED to share this post also on your website or social media, just keep the links and credit active PLEASE! THANKS!

A Woman’s Role? How Much Influence Do “The Movies” Have On Our Society

80by Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
in the article Cosmic Alchemy uniting the Hermetic Laws and the Native American Code of Ethics, I shared that humanity collectively needs to develop a higher level of emotional intelligence, so we can evolve as society into the Golden Age of Aquarius. One theme relate to the integration of this teachings, that we all need to take a closer look at, is the “role of a woman” in our world right now. An ongoing research on Walt Disney movies, by the linguists Carmen Fought and Karen Eisenhauer, that recently was discussed in the Washington Post, is warning us about how much influence the Hollywood movies might have on our ideas and concepts in modern society.

Their research has unveiled, that for example princesses in modern Disney movies don’t talk as much as one might think. A shocking discovery was that the activities allowed for female figures in this productions; got even less over the years. While Snow White from 1937, Cinderella from 1950 and Sleeping Beauty in 1959, still where focused on their female leading figures – in their remakes from 1989-1999 men speak no less than 72 percent of the lines!!!!
And lets think about that, these are films that where created over 50 years ago, but they give more opportunity for women to have their voices heard. Because collectively so many of us are watching these movies, it is important to be aware of what the films are teaching us about gender roles. And that is, that the films offer few examples of women being powerful, respected, useful or comedic.

A personal message to all my facebook friends!! FB is limiting the distribution of my posts daily more. If you resonate with my articles and are used to find my work  shared in a group, rather sign up on my newsletter here to make sure you get the information!!! Over time I might not be able to put in the FB time, if it does not lead to what it is about – SPREADING THE WORD ;-)!

Carmen Fought says. “There are no women leading the townspeople to go against the Beast, no women bonding together singing songs, women giving each other directions, or women inventing things. Everybody who’s doing anything else, other than finding a husband in the movies, pretty much is a male. We don’t believe that little girls naturally play a certain way or speak a certain way,” she adds “They’re not born liking a pink dress. At some point we teach them. So a big question is where girls get their ideas about being girls.”10

And that is also what the famous “Bechel Test” is looking out for. Providing another important measure for gender relate representation in the movie world today.

The three requirements of the Bechdel Test are:
1.) It has at least two women in it
2.) Who talk to each other, about
3.) Something besides a man

This does not sound like to much to ask for, don’t you think? Well, anyway the reality is that most famous Hollywood movies don’t pass the test. The most surprising is that even in romantic comedies, movies that worldwide by definition are created mainly for a feminine audience, the male dialogue is on average of 58%.

But than Hollywood movies are really only one way of measuring the world. And to the opposite of the Disney dream world, shamanic traditions, and historical descriptions show women as invoker of spirit, as natural healer, herbalists, oracles and ecstatic dancer, as shapeshifter, shamanic journeyer, and priestesses of the sacred ancestors. Women dance to the music of the drums and the flutes until they reached a state of trance; receive spirit into their bodies and evoke healing in others. And what that all has to do with the Hermetic Laws and the Native American Code of Ethics?
I would say “everything”!

When you remember the first divine principle states that; the universe is mental and everything material emerges from a first though. Not from a first “male thought”, because it translates into the  equality of all beings and a Brotherhood of Men. Now in daily life on planet earth, that does not necessarily mean we have the same chances or the same blessed start in life, but it does mean we all have an equal right to live!!! An equal right to demand space, speaking time and the respect to be heard with our needs. In Hollywood movies as much as in social interactions in daily life.nDear Ones, I hope this insides provoke one or the other of you to think about the so called “role of a woman” in our society. I hope it can be motivation enough to go out into the world, and find out what your inner truth on the topic is!! Don’t forget, what we do for ourselves – we do for everybody! The deeper we dive into setting our divine feminine powers freely in motion, the higher we can reach in expressing our authentic divine truth!!!
Love and Divine Feminine Light!
Edith

Source: Disney Research Washington Post

If you enjoy my posts, please sign up for my daily newsletter, JUST CLICK HERE & enter your e-mail. Please also like New Beginnings Guatemala on Facebook, and keep up the good work spreading the word ;-)! Feel INVITED to share this post also on your website or social media, just keep the links and credit active PLEASE! THANKS!

7 Sensational Herbs for Dream Recollection, Flying, & Spirit Communication

Dream Recollection

Our sleep offers a chance to temporarily free our selves from the physical reality that our body seems to constrain us to during the waking hours. That period of slumber is where dreams can come true, where we can escape physical grounding and have the ability to literally fly, travel anywhere we choose, and communicate with spirit guides. Check out these 7 herbs for dream recollection and dream enhancement and fill your dream journal up quickly!Xhosa Dream Root

1. Xhosa Dream Root – Vivid and Prophetic Dreams

You may find this herb labeled as it’s technical name Silene Capensis or as undlela zimhlophe, as it’s called by the Xhosa peoples of Africa. Noted as a ‘teaching plant’ and considered highly sacred, shamans traditionally use Xhosa dream root to promote lucid dream states in healers and other shamans during initiation ceremonies. If you aspire for more vivid and profound dreams or simply want to gain more universal insights from them, give this herb a shot – literally. You mix this in small amounts with water typically and consume it prior to sleeping. It also makes an interesting tasting tea but it can be bitter, so the ‘shot’ form is recommended.

 

Celastrus Paniculatus

2. Celastrus Paniculatus – The Elixir of Life

While this dreaming herb may sound like a spell Harry Potter would use, this amazing gift from Mother Nature packs a powerful punch and facilitates more than lucid dreams. It’s known for promoting longevity, sharpening the mind and memory, and it aids in concentration. This is perhaps why this herb is promoted to assist with ADD-type disorders, prevent epileptic seizures, and to aid in memory recollection in Alzheimer’s sufferers. Essentially, you benefit during the waking hours, and the herb keeps working while you sleep to fuel dream recollection!

 

Header-31C3. Blue Lotus – Mind Body Spirit Herb

A favorite used in yogic practices and meditation, the blue lotus is considered to be a source and possessor of the universe’s highest sacred energies in Hinduism. However, this relaxing herb promotes the mind body spirit connection as well as lucid dreaming states. This is also highly recommended for insomnia sufferers by many holistic healers. Typically consumed by smoking, in elixirs, and steeped in teas, if you have trouble dreaming or find yourself frequently waking up in dreams, blue lotus, aka Nymphaea Caerulea, may help.

 

Wild Asparagus Root

4. Wild Asparagus Root – Fly by Night

Reported to be SO effective at allowing one to fly in their dreams, many herbalists will advise against its use at all if you are not seeking to fly in your dream states. Also known as Asparagus Lucidus or Cochinensis, many Taoists use and recommend this herb for dream mobility, and reports have many users soaring through the skies and all across the universe and even into alternate realities and dimensions. Sweet and slightly bitter, most prefer to make a tea with this herb, and an additional ‘side-effect’ reported of regular wild asparagus root consumption is softer, more supple skin. Flying and skin benefits – ladies, this is YOUR dream herb!

 

African Dream Bean

5.  African Dream Bean – Master Spirit Connections

Known to promote euphoric lucid dreaming states, Entada Rheedii, or African Dream Bean is used by a number of tribes and cultures around Asia, Australia, and India. Often used in magic and rituals to proved users good luck, many find that their dreams are so powerful and vivid and declare that spirit communications are more accessible. This dreaming herb is typically dried and smoked, but some people get results by eating the bean’s internal seeds.

 

Mexican Tarragon

6. Mexican Tarragon – Grow a Garden of Herbs for Dreaming

Growing lovely flowering Mexican Tarragon can have you dreaming nightly and leave you with some eye candy in your herb garden. These Mexican Marigolds as they are also known, are an intrinsic part of Día de los Muertos festivities and are pretty commonly used as a spice. However, as a dreaming herb, one typically dries it for teas and smoking, but it can be burned as a bedtime incense to promote vivid images and dream recollection. Also revered for its anti-viral properties, these herbs for dreaming can be used in antiseptic solutions and essential oils.

 

Mugwort Herb

7. Mugwort – A Versatile Dreaming Herb

Also called Artemisa Vulgaris, this long time staple in Europe is superior for treating stomach ailments and eliminating parasitic invaders. This herb often helps one heal while dreaming. Some users report having darker dreams that reveal hidden insights, allowing them to better know themselves and mend from past hurts and experiences. Sweet and floral in scent, Mugwort is excellent for use in essential oils, teas, and for its aromatic qualities during ceremonies and meditation practices.

Source: http://quantumstones.com/7-sensational-herbs-dream-recollection-flying-spirit-communication/

Woman is by nature a shaman…

This is a brief summary of a visual presentation, first shown in 1986, which was given in September 2005 at the Shamanic Studies Conference in San Rafael, California.

A Chukchee proverb declares, “.” (1) Yet the female dimension of this realm of spiritual experience has often been slighted. Mircea Eliade believed that women shamans represented a degeneration of an originally masculine profession, yet was hard put to explain why so many male shamans customarily dressed in women’s clothing and assumed other female-gendered behaviors. Nor does the masculine-default theory account for widespread traditions, from Buryat Mongolia to the Bwiti religion in Gabon, that the first shaman was a woman.
In fact, women have been at the forefront of this field worldwide, and in some cultures, they predominate. This was true in ancient China and Japan, as it still is in modern Korea and Okinawa, as well as among many South African peoples and northern Californians such as the Karok and Yurok. There are countless other examples, including the machi of the Mapuche in southern Chile and the babaylan and catalonan of the Philippines.
images
Images, oral traditions, and historical descriptions show women as invokers, healers, herbalists, oracles and diviners, ecstatic dancers, shapeshifters, shamanic journeyers, and priestesses of the ancestors. The Chinese Wu were ecstatic priestesses who danced to the music of drums and flutes until they reached trance, receiving shen (spirits) into their bodies, healing and prophesying under their inspiration, speaking in tongues, swallowing swords and spitting fire. The power of the shen gathered around the whirling dancers was said to cause objects to rise into the air, to prevent wounds from forming when the dancers slashed themselves with knives.
Similar descriptions were recorded by Greco-Roman visitors to Anatolia: “At Castabala, in Cappadocia, the priestesses of an Asiatic goddess, whom the Greeks called Artemis Perasia, used to walk barefoot through a furnace of hot charcoal and take no harm.” (2)
Shaman
Certain female burials from ancient Central Asia have been designated as shamanic priestesses by archaeologists Natalia Polosmak and Jeanine Davis-Kimball. The priestess of Ukok (fifth century BCE) was buried in a three-foot-tall framed headdress adorned with a Tree of Life, with gilded felines and birds on its branches. Similar finds have been excavated at Ussun’ in south Kazakhstan, and from the Ukraine to the Tarim basin, with recurrent themes of the Tree of Life headdress, amulets, incense, medicine bags, and sacramental mirrors. Such mirrors are also seen in the Bactrian region of Afghanistan, held facing out against the body, and they still figure as initiatory devices wielded by female adepts in Tibet. The overwhelmingly female mikogami of Japan also kept the “sacred mirror” of the sun goddess Amaterasu.
My visual presentation Woman Shaman includes a sequence of women shapeshifting into animal form or riding on the backs of shamanic steeds. These themes recur in many shamanic traditions, and are vividly illustrated in modern Arctic carvings. An Aleut ivory (circa 1816) shows a woman shaman wearing an animal mask. Other examples from the mid-20th century include “Woman Riding a Bear” by Cecilia Arnadjuk, Repulse Bay, Canada; “Woman/Polar Bear” by Odin Maratse, Greenland; a walrus-tusked “Woman Shaman” by Nancy Pukingrnak of Baker Lake; a half-woman, half-walrus piece titled “Woman Shaman Transforming Herself”; and “Medicine Woman” by Kaka of Cape Dorset.
shaman-tree
The darwisa or maraboutes of North Africa bear Islamic titles, but practice much older North African customs. Among the Tunisian cave-dwellers, the darwisa cures sick people from possession from the jnun. In the ritual, she plays drum rhythms to discover which jinn caused illness; when she hits the right one, the person begins to dance. Then the darwisa talks to the spirit about what caused the illness and what is required to cure it. (3)
Codices produced by Aztec artists shortly after the Spanish conquest show women presiding over the temescal (sweat lodge). One of the invocations sung by such a priestess was recorded: “Mother of the gods and us all, whose creative and lifegiving power shone in the Temezcalli, also named Xochicalli, the place where she sees sacred things, sets to right what has been deranged in human bodies, makes young and tender things growing and strong, and where she aids and cures.” (4)
curanderaInvocatory chants have remained an element of Mexican Indian shamanism. One of the great master was Maria Sabina, “the woman who knows how to swim in the sacred,” whose incantations seem to have acted as a means of entering into deep states of consciousness. Laying on of hands was part of her healing practice. Further north, in California, Bernice Torrez of the Kashaya Pomo, healed by touching and removing spirits of illness from the body of the sick person. She was the daughter of Essie Parrish, the great yomta, a title which means “Song.” This prophet-seeress carried chants for ceremonies, healing, and control of the elements.
Chant and shaking a sacred rattle are important elements in the practice of Katjambia, a Himba medicine woman in Namibia. As she shakes the rattle, she calls out Njoo, Njoo, in a “secret language from Angola.” After absorbing the negative energies into her own body, Katjambia returns to the sacred fire of her ancestors, who release them. A song by the Chilean composer and folklorist Violeta Parra celebrates the powers of the Mapuche machi, describing how she presides over the guillatún ceremonies and how her shamanizing cures the sick and brings a crop-threatening rain to an end.
The healing power of female shamans was occasionally stated to have been so far-reaching that they were described as being able to restore life to the dead. So it was told of Pa Sini Jobu, great Tungutu of the Bosso people in the middle Niger region. Her method of dancing to ecstasy and shifting into the form of a great bird echoes the story told of Isis. Both the goddess and the Tungutu are described as beating their wings over the dead (a ram, in Pa Sini Jobu’s case) and bringing them to life. (The Colchian sorceress Medea is also pictured bringing a ram to life, using a cauldron, herbs, and incantations.) In western Africa, the sorceress Kulutugubaga has the power to heal all and bring the dead to life. She is the last of the legendary Nine Sorceresses of Mande.
drummer
Reviving the dead was one of the marvels performed by Yeshe Tsogyel, a foundational figure of Tibetan Buddhism. In Lady of the Lotus Born, she says, “… In Nepal I brought a dead man back to life… My body journeyed like a rainbow in celestial fields…” (5) This 8th-century poem is loaded with shamanistic content, recast in a Buddhist mold. The shamanic Bönpo religion is known to have contributed many elements to Tibetan Buddhism.
A Manchurian epic, Nishan Shaman, turns around the story of a woman who is the most powerful shaman in the country. She is called upon to revive the son of a rich man after countless others had failed. She beats her drum, chants, and sinks as if lifeless herself while journeying to the Otherworld, where she meets up with Omosi-mama, the “divine grandmother” who “causes leaves to unfurl and the roots to spread properly,” who is the giver of souls and protectress of children. It was she who ordained that Nishan would become a great shaman.
Of course, Nishan finds the soul of the dead boy. But she is pursued by her long-dead husband, who demands to be saved as well, but she calls for a great crane to seize him and throw him back into the city of the dead. The shaman is hailed as a heroine when she comes back to the upper world and showered with riches. Later she faces repression from Confucian authorities who accuse her of not being an obedient wife, and they burn her shamanic regalia and drum. (6)
KAKAO BILD
In much the same way, Spanish colonials persecuted women shamans in the Philippines, calling them “devil-ridden old women” and “witches,” and destroying their shrines and sacred objects. (7) Maya oracles and shamans faced the same treatment; the Tzoltzil priestess María Candelaria raised an insurrection in Chiapas in 1712 to resist the repression of the indigenous religion.
Several hundred years ago, the Jesuit Acosta wrote that Peruvian witches were shapeshifters who could journey through the skies and foretell the future “by means of certain stones or other things they highly venerate.” He and other Spanish sources agreed that the witches were mostly old women.(8) The colonials imposed their own preconceptions on Peruvian shamans, notably that of the devil and flying ointments, and persecuted these Quechua and Aymara women shamans as witches.
The Peruvian Inquisition forbade seeking knowledge through dreams or signs in the sky or through vision quests: “the said women other times go out to the country by day and at night, and take certain brews of herbs and roots, called achuma and chamico and coca, with which they deceive themselves and numb their senses, and the illusions and fantastic scenes which they experience there, they think and claim afterwards as revelations, or certain news of what will happen.” (9)

Inquisitors tried the curandera Juana Icha for healing with the power of the old Quechua gods. She had offered corn meal, coca and chicha to the mountain spirit Apo Parato. An Indian informer told the monks that she “worships the earth and the stars and cries to the water.” (10)

Source: http://www.suppressedhistories.net/articles/womanshaman.html