Native American Leadership Guidelines – Fit For The Golden Age

aby Edith Boyer-Telmer

Dear Friends,
at the beginnings of this month I shared in my article Native American wisdom for the collective awakening process, that it might be time for us to make ourselves familiar with some guidelines and rules, that can lead the human collective into the Golden Age of Aquarius. A leading voice in the movement of educating people from the western culture in the Native American ways of life, was the Sioux Chief “Standing Bear”. He became a leader on the forefront of the progressive movement, that aims to preserve Native American heritage and sovereignty. His wisdom remains as part guidance for us today and for many collective steps to come..

 1) Praise, flattery, exaggerated manners and fine, high-sounding words were no part of Lakota politeness. Excessive manners were put down as insincere, and the constant talker was considered rude and thoughtless. Conversation was never begun at once, or in a hurried manner.

2) Children were taught that true politeness was to be defined in actions rather than in words. They were never allowed to pass between the fire and the older person or a visitor, to speak while others were speaking, or to make fun of a crippled or disfigured person. If a child thoughtlessly tried to do so, a parent, in a quiet voice, immediately set him right.

3) Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and disregardful of the rule that ‘thought comes before speech.’…and in the midst of sorrow, sickness, death or misfortune of any kind, and in the presence of the notable and great, silence was the mark of respect… strict observance of this tenet of good behavior was the reason, no doubt, for his being given the false characterization by the white man of being a stoic. He has been judged to be dumb, stupid, indifferent, and unfeeling.

4) We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, the winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild’. Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was it ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery.n5) With all creatures of the earth, sky and water was a real and active principle. In the animal and bird world there existed a brotherly feeling that kept the Lakota safe among them. And so close did some of the Lakota’s come to their feathered and furred friends that in true brotherhood they spoke a common tongue.

6) This concept of life and its relations was humanizing and gave to the Lakota an abiding love. It filled his being with the joy and mystery of living; it gave him reverence for all life; it made a place for all things in the scheme of existence with equal importance to all.

7) It was good for the skin to touch the earth
, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth… the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.
8) Everything was possessed of personality, only differing from us in form. Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library and its books were the stones, leaves, grass, brooks, and the birds and animals that shared, alike with us, the storms and blessings of earth. We learned to do what only the student of nature learns, and that was to feel beauty. We never railed at the storms, the furious winds, and the biting frosts and snows. To do so intensified human futility, so whatever came we adjusted ourselves, by more effort and energy if necessary, but without complaint.

9) …the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.

10) Civilization has been thrust upon me and it has not added one whit to my love for truth, honesty, and generosity.Lakota-Dear Ones, I hope this guidelines for human life, from the Native American Sioux Chief “Standing Bear”,help you manifest your Golden Age and much more…  I hope you are all about to discover what that means for you and your path!!
Love and Blessings!

Edith

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Nepal Chooses Kindness — ENDING The World’s Largest Animal Sacrifice Event

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Dear Friends,
I feel happy, excited and inspired to  share this article with you!! Beautiful things happen on the planet!! What an amazing first step for humanity and our friends from the animal kingdom – the Gadhimai slaughter festival will never be a festival of slaughter again!!!
Remember, just last month I shared two article about the waves of energy we currently receive from heavens, and how they carry the potential for healing with the animal world,  https://edithboyertelmer.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/the-june-2015-solstice/https://edithboyertelmer.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/sacred-circle-for-calling-the-animals-into-the-diamond-vortex-by-celia-fenn/. And here it is! First chance given – first chance taken – for humanity, a big step on its way into the creation of a world in balance and harmony. And a loud statement that cruelty in the name of tradition is no longer tolerateable!!  We need to be brave and embrace changing our actions on all levels of life!
Go home – hug your dog, watch a bird on your way to work or enjoy the sound of bees in the air!! Remember the peace that comes from understanding, how we are naturally one with nature!!
Blessings Edith
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Gadhimai Slaughter was blamed for the massive earthquake that hit in April and killed nearly 10,000 lives. People called it the nature’s way of punishment to humanity. Irrespective of the truth, it has influenced this decision in many ways.
In a glorious tribute to the power of compassion, the Gadhimai slaughter festival will now be a ‘momentous celebration of life.’
For centuries the Gadhimai festival in Nepal has seen temple grounds awash with the blood of animals slaughtered in the name of ‘tradition’.
This sacrifice has occurred every five years for the last 300 years.
And it stopped — today.

The Gadhimai Temple Trust hereby declares our formal decision to end animal sacrifice. With your help, we can ensure Gadhimai 2019 is free from bloodshed. Moreover, we can ensure Gadhimai 2019 is a momentous celebration of life … For every life taken, our heart is heavy. The time has come to transform an old tradition.

Hundreds of thousands of water buffalo, goats, chickens and other animals will now be saved from a brutal death by bludgeoning or decapitation.animal sacrifice event in nepal
This achievement is no small feat. We take our hats off to the extraordinary efforts of the Humane Society International/IndiaAnimal Welfare Network Nepal, and countless animal protection groups and individuals around the world who have helped inspire this victory of kindness over cruelty.
And, of course, greatest credit must go to the members of The Gadhimai Temple Trust itself, who recognized that the power to change the trajectory of our common humanity is in our hands.

The Gadhimai Temple Trust has shown that tradition is no excuse for cruelty with its landmark decision.

 

The incredible news exploded on social media, where a long running campaign has been waged on behalf of the victims of the festival. It is yet another signpost that the pathway our species is paving for itself is slowly but surely bending towards a more compassionate future, championed by caring people in every country of the world.
That is to say, we are getting kinder.
Worldwide, never before has there been such a rate of positive change — in public policy; in commerce; in public awareness and advocacyAnd never before have the animals of this world needed it so much. We have, after all, inherited an age where the majority of animals in human ‘care’ are valued not as living, thinking beings, but as commodities — spending their entire lives confined in factory farms. Nothing short of a profound global shift in thought is needed to awaken our shared responsibility toward our fellow species and break this global cycle of suffering.The Gadhimai Temple Trust has shown that tradition is no excuse for cruelty with its landmark decision.
Could the previously un-thought of Gadhimai ‘celebration of life’ festival be a sign that a kinder world is possible?
Some of the most entrenched cruelty in this world has long been defended in the name of ‘tradition’.
The Festival of Sacrifice is responsible for untold suffering of cattle, sheep and goats — millions of whom have been sold for profit through Australia’s live export trade; closer to home, in the name of Christmas, highly intelligent pigs and turkeys not only experience the terror of slaughter, but entire lifetimes of suffering in factory farms; and sporting events such as bull fights and rodeos still present cruelty as ‘entertainment’…
When kind people seek to transform cruel traditions, they don’t risk losing their identity. They strengthen it by demonstrating that culture cannot be measured by the repetition of practices frozen in time by values of the past. For this, the tradition of the Gadhimai festival will become all the stronger.
In another Nepalese tradition, there is an entire calendar day called ‘Kukur Tihar’ dedicated entirely to thanking dogs for their friendship and loyalty.
It takes compassion and courage to rise above cruelty and recognize that the ways of doing things we inherit from the past do not define us; to recognize that those we share this world with, also share our desire to avoid suffering. Whether in our temples, or in our homes, we can all choose to live without killing.

The roots of cruelty are not so much strong as widespread. But the time must come when inhumanity protected by custom and thoughtlessness will succumb before humanity championed by thought. Let us work that this time may come. Albert SchweitzerIn another Nepalese tradition, there is an entire calendar day called 'Kukur Tihar' dedicated entirely to thanking dogs for their friendship and loyalty.Compassion is fundamental to all human cultures — and when it shines through, traditions steeped in cruelty can be transformed. On scales grand and small, if we want to live in a kinder world, we all have a role to play.

And if the world’s largest animal sacrifice event can be transformed into a ‘celebration of life’, then there is reason to be infinitely hopeful about the future.

10 Quotes From a Oglala Lakota Chief That Will Make You Question Everything About Our Society

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By Wisdom Pills / wisdompills.com


Luther Standing Bear was an Oglala Lakota Sioux Chief who, among a few rare others such as Charles EastmanBlack Elk and Gertrude Bonnin occupied the rift between the way of life of the Indigenous people of the Great Plains before, and during, the arrival and subsequent spread of the European pioneers. Raised in the traditions of his people until the age of eleven, he was then educated at the Carlisle Indian Industrial Boarding School of Pennsylvania, where he learned the english language and way of life. (Though a National Historical Landmark, Carlisle remains a place of controversy in Native circles.)
Like his above mentioned contemporaries, however, his native roots were deep, leaving him in the unique position of being a conduit between cultures. Though his movement through the white man’s world was not without “success” — he had numerous movie roles in Hollywood — his enduring legacy was the protection of the way of life of his people.

By the time of his death he had published 4 books and had become a leader at the forefront of the progressive movement aimed at preserving Native American heritage and sovereignty, coming to be known as a strong voice in the education of the white man as to the Native American way of life. Here, then, are 10 quotes from the great Sioux Indian Chief known as Standing Bear that will be sure to disturb much of what you think you know about “modern” culture.

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 1) Praise, flattery, exaggerated manners and fine, high-sounding words were no part of Lakota politeness. Excessive manners were put down as insincere, and the constant talker was considered rude and thoughtless. Conversation was never begun at once, or in a hurried manner.
2) Children were taught that true politeness was to be defined in actions rather than in words. They were never allowed to pass between the fire and the older person or a visitor, to speak while others were speaking, or to make fun of a crippled or disfigured person. If a child thoughtlessly tried to do so, a parent, in a quiet voice, immediately set him right.

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3) Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and regardful of the rule that ‘thought comes before speech.’…and in the midst of sorrow, sickness, death or misfortune of any kind, and in the presence of the notable and great, silence was the mark of respect… strict observance of this tenet of good behavior was the reason, no doubt, for his being given the false characterization by the white man of being a stoic. He has been judged to be dumb, stupid, indifferent, and unfeeling.
4) We did not think of the great open plains, the beautiful rolling hills, the winding streams with tangled growth, as ‘wild’. Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was it ‘infested’ with ‘wild’ animals and ‘savage’ people. To us it was tame. Earth was bountiful and we were surrounded with the blessings of the Great Mystery.
5) With all creatures of the earth, sky and water was a real and active principle. In the animal and bird world there existed a brotherly feeling that kept the Lakota safe among them. And so close did some of the Lakotas come to their feathered and furred friends that in true brotherhood they spoke a common tongue.

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 6) This concept of life and its relations was humanizing and gave to the Lakota an abiding love. It filled his being with the joy and mystery of living; it gave him reverence for all life; it made a place for all things in the scheme of existence with equal importance to all.

feet7) It was good for the skin to touch the earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with bare feet on the sacred earth… the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.
8) Everything was possessed of personality, only differing from us in form. Knowledge was inherent in all things. The world was a library and its books were the stones, leaves, grass, brooks, and the birds and animals that shared, alike with us, the storms and blessings of earth. We learned to do what only the student of nature learns, and that was to feel beauty. We never railed at the storms, the furious winds, and the biting frosts and snows. To do so intensified human futility, so whatever came we adjusted ourselves, by more effort and energy if necessary, but without complaint.
9) …the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.
10) Civilization has been thrust upon me… and it has not added one whit to my love for truth, honesty, and generosity.

Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/10-quotes-from-a-oglala-lakota-chief-that-will-make-you-question-everything-about-our-society/